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Computers & Math News -- ScienceDaily
Computers & Math News -- ScienceDaily
Hacking and computer security. Read today's research news on hacking and protecting against codebreakers. New software, secure data sharing, and more.

PowerPoint, LED projector enable new technique for self-folding origami
A new use for the ubiquitous PowerPoint slide has now been discovered: Producing self-folding three-dimensional origami structures from photocurable liquid polymers.
Mapping the edge of reality
A genetic algorithm has been determined to confirm the rejection of classical notions of causality.
Hybrid circuits can increase computational power of chaos-based systems
Combining digital and analog components in nonlinear, chaos-based integrated circuits can improve their computational power by enabling processing of a larger number of inputs, new research shows.
Ultracold atom waves may shed light on rogue ocean killers
By precisely controlling the quantum behavior of an ultracold atomic gas, physicists have created a model system for studying the wave phenomenon that may bring about rogue waves in Earth's oceans.
No, complex is not complicated -- it is rather simple
The simplest experimental system to date to identify the minimum requirements for the emergence of complexity has been developed.
Artificial intelligence shows potential to fight blindness
Researchers have found a way to use artificial intelligence to fight a complication of diabetes that affects the eyes.
Can early experiences with computers, robots increase STEM interest among young girls?
Girls start believing they aren't good at math, science and even computers at a young age -- but providing fun STEM activities at school and home may spark interest and inspire confidence, suggests a new study.
A turbo engine for tracing neurons
Putting a turbo engine into an old car gives it an entirely new life -- suddenly it can go further, faster. That same idea is now being applied to neuroscience, with a software wrapper that can be used on existing neuron tracing algorithms to boost their ability to handle not just big, but enormous sets of data. The wrapper is called UltraTracer.
Light has new capacity for electronics
In 'Minority Report,' the protagonist uses gloves that give him the power of virtual manipulation. The light seems to allow him to control the screen as if it were a touchscreen, but he's touching nothing but air. That technology is still science fiction, but a new study may bring it closer to reality. Researchers report that they have discovered the photodielectric effect, which could lead to laser-controlled touch displays.
How state-of-the-art camera that behaves like the human eye could benefit robots and smart devices
Experts will explore how an artificial vision system inspired by the human eye could be used by robots of the future -- opening up new possibilities for securing footage from deep forests, war zones and even distant planets.
Looking for the quantum frontier
A new theoretical framework has been developed to identify computations that occupy the 'quantum frontier' - the boundary at which problems become impossible for today's computers and can only be solved by a quantum computer. The team demonstrates that these computations can be performed with near-term, intermediate, quantum computers.
Twitter could have predicted the outcome of the Brexit vote
Leave campaigners were not only victorious in the June 2016 Brexit vote but also in the battle of the Twittersphere, a new study reports.
Strong potential of E-health to increase vaccination coverage in Europe, study concludes
Twenty one EU/EEA countries have developed or are in the process of developing systems to digitally record information about vaccination, according to a new report. Fourteen of these countries already have a system in place, whereas innovative systems are being piloted in 7 countries.
Virtual humans help aspiring doctors learn empathy
Delivering bad news in a caring way -- and coping with a patient's reaction -- is a key skill for doctors. Intuitive technology is helping medical students learn the best approaches.
Using math to investigate possibility of time travel
After some serious number crunching, a researcher says that he has come up with a mathematical model for a viable time machine: a Traversable Acausal Retrograde Domain in Space-time (TARDIS). He describes it as a bubble of space-time geometry which carries its contents backward and forwards through space and time as it tours a large circular path. The bubble moves through space-time at speeds greater than the speed of light at times, allowing it to move backward in time.
System can 3-D print an entire building
Researchers have developed a system that can 3-D print the basic structure of an entire building.
Smartphone-controlled cells help keep diabetes in check
Cells engineered to produce insulin under the command of a smartphone helped keep blood sugar levels within normal limits in diabetic mice, a new study reports.
New theoretical approach to describing non-equilibrium phase transitions
Two physicists have offered a way to mathematically describe a particular physics phenomenon called a phase transition in a system out of equilibrium. Such phenomena are central in physics, and understanding how they occur has been a long-held and vexing goal; their behavior and related effects are key to unlocking possibilities for new electronics and other next-generation technologies.
2-D materials can conduct electricity at almost the speed of light
New two-dimensional quantum materials have been created with breakthrough electrical and magnetic attributes that could make them building blocks of future quantum computers and other advanced electronics. The researchers explored the physics behind the 2-D states of novel materials and determined they could push computers to new heights of speed and power.
Synthetic two-sided gecko's foot could enable underwater robotics
Geckos are well known for effortlessly scrambling up walls and upside down across ceilings. Even in slippery rain forests, the lizards maintain their grip. Now scientists have created a double-sided adhesive that copies this reversible ability to stick and unstick to surfaces even in wet conditions. They say their development could be useful in underwater robotics, sensors and other bionic devices.
The automation of art: A legal conundrum
Deep Neural Networks are systems that are able to simulate human perception by 'memorizing' complex patterns on a mathematical level. One application for this is in the arts, where these systems are used for their creative potential. As DNN's become more popular, there is the danger of an unchecked proliferation of copyright protections, which risks stifling creativity. In order to prevent this, we should focus on the human element within the complex technological processes that engender automated art.
New method addresses reproducibility in computational experiments
Scientists have developed a workflow management system that addresses irreproducibility when analyzing large genomics datasets with computers. Nextflow contributes to establishing good scientific practices and provides an important framework for those research projects where the analysis of large datasets are used to take decisions, for example, in precision medicine.
Managing disease spread through accessible modeling
A new computer modeling study is aimed at making epidemiological models more accessible and useful for public-health collaborators and improving disease-related decision making.
Artificial intelligence may help diagnose tuberculosis in remote areas
Researchers are training artificial intelligence models to identify tuberculosis (TB) on chest X-rays, which may help screening and evaluation efforts in TB-prevalent areas with limited access to radiologists, according to a new study.
New interface allows more efficient, faster technique to remotely operate robots
A new interface allows users to simply point and click on an item, then choose a grasp, to control a robot remotely.
A more than 100% quantum step toward producing hydrogen fuel
Efforts to reduce our dependence on fossil fuels are advancing on various significant fronts. Initiatives include research focused on more efficient production of gaseous hydrogen fuel by using solar energy to break water down into components of hydrogen and oxygen. Scientists have now reported a key breakthrough in the basic science essential for progress toward this goal.
When artificial intelligence evaluates chess champions
The ELO system, which most chess federations use today, ranks players by the results of their games. Although simple and efficient, it overlooks relevant criteria such as the quality of the moves players actually make. To overcome these limitations, Reseachers have now developed a new system.
When Hollywood met neurosurgery
A team of computer engineers and neurosurgeons, with an assist from Hollywood special effects experts, reports successful early tests of a novel, lifelike 3-D simulator designed to teach surgeons to perform a delicate, minimally invasive brain operation.
Click-on arm prosthesis controlled by patient's thoughts
Last Friday, the first patient in the Netherlands received his click-on robotic arm. By means of a new technique, this robotic arm is clicked directly onto the bone. A unique characteristic of this prosthesis is that it can be controlled by the patient's own thoughts. Worldwide, there are only a handful of patients with such a prosthesis.
Model for multivalley polaritons
Scientists model the formation of multivalleys in semiconductor microcavities, bringing new ideas to the emerging valleytronics field.
Understanding malaria with mathematics
Mathematical formulas that model how deadly mosquito-borne diseases spread can help medical researchers accurately predict how real-life outbreaks develop and find countermeasures, report scientists.
Scientific discovery game significantly speeds up neuroscience research process
A new scientific discovery game called Mozak is allowing video gamers to significantly speed up reconstructing the intricate architecture of brain cells, a fundamental task in 21st century brain science. These citizen scientists have outperformed computers in tracing the intricate shapes of neurons, a first step in understanding how our brain circuitry works.
Growth under pressure: New metamaterial designed with counterintuitive property
Inspired by 3-D printing, researchers explored development of one mechanical property called effective static compressibility. As they now report, by using a single cartridge it's possible to print a metamaterial which expands in size under hydrostatic pressure, even though it's made up of material which behaves normally under hydrostatic pressure -- that is, it shrinks. In principle, there is no limit to the negative value this material's effective compressibility can take.
First-ever direct observation of chiral currents in quantum Hall atomic simulation
Using an atomic quantum simulator, scientists have achieved the first-ever direct observation of chiral currents in the model topological insulator, the 2-D integer quantum Hall system.
After the death of a friend, healing in a human social network
The first large-scale study of recovery and resilience after a death in a friend group -- based on analysis of interactions in 15,000 anonymized networks on Facebook -- finds that when a friend dies, we get closer to that person's friends. The social network repairs itself in ways that keep our total connectedness the same.
Bright future for self-charging batteries
Who hasn't lived through the frustrating experience of being without a phone after forgetting to recharge it? This could one day be a thing of the past thanks to technology under development.
Polymeric fluids behavior revealed at the microscopic scale
An important concept in future healthcare is the development of devices called "lab on a chip". These "chips" are injected to fill specifically designed microscopic channels. These channels contain biosensors which detect, for example, specific markers for diseases within the fluid and provide a quick diagnosis. However, an arising issue is the size of the fluid sample injected inside the chip, with tiny volumes down to a billionth of a liter. Due to lack of available technologies, researchers do not yet fully understand how fluids -- particularly complex ones of biological origins -- behave at such small scales.
Space technologies improve surgeries back on earth
A novel surgical robotic system has been developed that provides tactile feedback and is capable of single-incision and natural orifice (incision-free) robotic surgery. The system minimizes surgical trauma and is safer than currently available robotic systems.
Facebook plays vital role in reducing government corruption, researchers find
An economics researcher says the popular social media website – and its open sharing of information – is a vital and often a significant tool against government corruption in countries where press freedom is curbed or banned.
New digital map shows changing racial diversity of America
A geography professor built the most detailed map of racial diversity yet to study the way America's neighborhoods are changing.
New survey: Snapchat and Instagram are most popular social media platforms among American teens
A new nationally representative survey of American teenagers age 13-17 finds that teens have shifted their favored social media platforms and are now most likely to use Instagram and Snapchat. The study also found that while almost all teens -- 91 percent -- use the regular text messaging tool on their mobile phones, 40 percent of teens also use messaging applications like Kik, WhatsApp, or Line on a smartphone.
Quantum mechanics is complex enough, for now...
Physicists have searched for deviations from standard quantum mechanics, testing whether quantum mechanics requires a more complex set of mathematical rules. To do so a research team designed a new photonic experiment using exotic metamaterials. Their experiment supports standard quantum mechanics and allows the scientists to place bounds on alternative quantum theories. The results could help to guide theoretical work in a search for a more general version of quantum mechanics.
Molecular libraries for organic light-emitting diodes
Organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) are promising candidates for flexible flat displays. By means of a screening process, it is now possible to identify more quickly lead structures with superior luminescence and charge-transport properties.
Application of statistical method shows promise mitigating climate change effects on pine
Confronting evidence that the global climate is changing rapidly relative to historical trends, researchers have developed a new statistical model that, when applied to the loblolly pine tree populations in the southeastern United States, will benefit forest landowners and the forest industry in future decades.
New quantum liquid crystals may play role in future of computers
The first 3-D quantum liquid crystals may have applications in quantum computing, report scientists. Liquid crystals fall somewhere in between a liquid and a solid: they are made up of molecules that flow around freely as if they were a liquid but are all oriented in the same direction, as in a solid. Liquid crystals can be found in nature, such as in biological cell membranes. Alternatively, they can be made artificially -- such as those found in the liquid crystal displays commonly used in watches, smartphones, televisions, and other items that have display screens.
Researchers unlock hardware's hidden talent for rendering 3-D graphics for science -- and video games
High performance computing researcher asked if hardware called 3-D stacked memory could do something it was never designed to do -- help render 3-D graphics.
Fidelity in a marriage between electronic and optical effects
Simultaneously simulating electrical and optical input achieves unprecedented performance in electro-optical interfaces, report investigators.
Geeking out in the golden years
In the first known study of older adults learning computer programming, a cognitive scientist advocates coding skills for all ages.
Periodic model predicts spread of Lyme disease
Lyme disease is among the most common vector-borne illnesses in North America, Europe, and some parts of Asia. A spirochete bacterium called Borrelia burgdorferi causes the disease, and blacklegged ticks are responsible for the majority of North American transmissions. In a new paper, researchers present a mathematical model of Lyme disease that incorporates seasonality and climate factors.
Making batteries from waste glass bottles
Researchers have used waste glass bottles and a low-cost chemical process to create nanosilicon anodes for high-performance lithium-ion batteries. The batteries will extend the range of electric vehicles and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles, and provide more power with fewer charges to personal electronics like cell phones and laptops.
Online preconception health education tool positively impacts patient care
A research team has evaluated MyFamilyPlan and found that it enabled a significant increase in the proportion of women who reported discussing their reproductive health with their doctors.
Nanoparticles remain unpredictable
The way that nanoparticles behave in the environment is extremely complex. There is currently a lack of systematic experimental data to help understand them comprehensively, as environmental scientists have shown in a large overview study. A more standardized approach would help to advance the research field.
Degradable electronic components created from corn starch
As consumers upgrade their gadgets at an increasing pace, the amount of electronic waste we generate continues to mount. To help combat this environmental problem, researchers have modified a degradable bioplastic derived from corn starch or other natural sources for use in more eco-friendly electronic components.
Gaming helps personalized therapy level up
Using game features in non-game contexts, computers can learn to build personalized mental- and physical-therapy programs that enhance individual motivation, according to engineers.
Robotic cheetah created
Engineers have developed a prototype cheetah robot. They have constructed a scaled-down robotic version of the fastest land animal in the world, with a view to replicating its movements. Relatively speaking, the robot moves using only about fifteen percent more energy than a real cheetah.
Personalized workouts to prevent heart disease designed by new digital instrument
Personalized workouts to prevent heart disease can be designed by a new digital instrument, according to research. The EXPERT tool specifies the ideal exercise type, intensity, frequency, and duration needed to prevent a first or repeat cardiovascular event.
Energy-efficient computing: Damping gives a faster switch
Controlling memory with electric fields enables faster and more energy-efficient computing.
Communicating tsunami evacuations effectively
An effective communication approach incorporating computer simulations could help people find practical means to evacuate in the event of a tsunami.
Technology is great, but are we prepared for the consequences?
Dependence on technology is slowly eroding some of our core principles, according to an expert. It's impacting everything from fake news to texting while driving.
Understanding decisions: The power of combining psychology and economics
A new article shows how collaborations between psychologists and economists lead to better understanding of such decisions than either discipline can on its own.

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